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Life By The Glass

Carefully Curated. Completely Engaging.

Pot-Au-Feu

Recipes

Pot-au-feu which means “pot on the fire” in French is very similar to the Italian Bollito Misto or to a New England or Irish boiled dinner. Piquant, briny, condiments are usually served with the meat to counter the richness. Though you may be tempted to add the potatoes right to the pot, that would “trouble the broth,” as the French would say, making it cloudy. Cook them separately to keep the broth clear. Serve with the rich Owsley Pinot Noir.

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Quick Cured Salmon

Recipes

This is a gravlax approach which the Scandinavians are famous for. Here, it is cured for just a few minutes and then top with a lemon and herb vinaigrette. It’s important that the salmon be frozen first before cutting, as this will make it easier to slice. This dish is a delicious accompaniment for Les Pierres Chardonnay with its crisp, citrus notes.

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Pan-Roasted Chicken with Tarragon Mustard Cream

Recipes

Chef Ash recommends using skin-on, boneless breasts with the end of the wing bone still attached for this recipe. Your butcher can easily do this for you. The mustard and tarragon are classic ingredients to pair with Chardonnay, in this case, our Russian River Ranches with its lovely balanced fruit.

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Shrimp & Zucchini Noodles

Recipes

Here fresh zucchini noodles replace conventional pasta, making this dish gluten free. You can find vegetable pasta cutters at good cookware stores or online, which will make cutting the zucchini noodles much simpler. The sweet shrimp along with the buttery zucchini is a perfect match for the Sonoma-Cutrer Les Pierres Chardonnay.

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Green And White Pizza

Recipes

This is a fast and easy recipe, now that premade pizza dough is widely available. Any young greens may be substituted for the arugula in this recipe, but the spiciness of arugula works especially well. Serve with a glass of Sonoma-Cutrer The Cutrer Chardonnay for a delicious and quick weeknight meal.

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Salt-Roasted Pork Tenderloin

Recipes

Roasting in salt creates an even temperature and results in juicy meat, fish or fowl. It’s simple to do, but Chef Ash recommends having an instant-read thermometer to monitor the internal temperature of the meat. Serve with the Sonoma-Cutrer Vine Hill Pinot Noir for something special.

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Home-Cured Corned Beef

Recipes

Corning is an old English term that refers to pellets of salt called corns. Commercial corned beef uses many preservatives and the quality of the meat isn’t usually very good. It’s easy and so much more delicious to do your own!

This recipe can easily be doubled or tripled. The only uncommon ingredient in this recipe with the pink salt which is available in spice shops and on-line. It’s not the same as Himalayan pink salt. It accounts for the deep red color or the beef and gives a distinctive flavor.

Try this with the Sonoma-Cutrer’s Owsley Pinot Noir, which will stand up to the big flavor.

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BBQ Shrimp with Peach Chutney

Recipes

This may seem like a complicated recipe but it’s really not and brings together two favorite accompaniments for the summer barbecue: Peach chutney and coffee barbecue sauce. Make both of these a day or two ahead and store refrigerated. Keep the leftovers on hand to use with grilled chicken or pork. A glass of chilled Sonoma-Cutrer Les Pierres Chardonnay paired with this dish would be the perfect way to celebrate the summer holidays.

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Jerk Chicken

Recipes

From Jamaica and the Caribbean, Jerk Chicken is traditionally grilled but you could also roast in a 400-degree oven and finish under a hot broiler for a couple of minutes to crisp the skin and give it a little char.

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Cooking for the Holidays with Chef John Ash

Recipes

Tired of serving the same dishes at every holiday gathering? Try some unique alternative dishes from Chef John Ash and serve a menu that will have your guests asking for more!

  • Pumpkin Soup with Wild Mushrooms
  • Warm Red Cabbage Salad with Pancetta and California Goat Cheese
  • Crab Newberg
  • Cider Brined and Smoked Game Hens
  • My Grandmother’s Apple Batter Cake
  • Pumpkin Soup with Wild Mushrooms

Perfect for the Thanksgiving (or harvest) table, this seasonal soup showcases pumpkin along with another fall favorite – – wild mushrooms. Serve with a glass of the Sonoma-Cutrer Russian River Chardonnay.

Warm Red Cabbage Salad with Pancetta and California Goat Cheese

For the goat cheese, I especially like the Bucheret, Camellia or Crottin from Redwood Hill Farms (www.redwoodhillfarms.com) or the Humboldt fog or Bermuda Triangle from Cypress Grove (www.cypressgrovechevre.com). Serve with Sonoma-Cutrer Les Pierres Chardonnay.

Crab Newberg

Dungeness Crab season begins in Northern California right around Thanksgiving, so we try to use it in as many ways as possible. This is a great dish from the past, and uses a classic egg yolk thickened sauce. It’s traditionally served on toast points but can also be spooned into little puff or choux pastry shells or in crepes. The mineral-ality of Sonoma-Cutrer Les Pierres would be a great match here.

Cider Brined and Smoked Game Hens

This brine works equally well with chicken or turkey. Brining is sort of a magical process that adds both flavor and moistness to the meat. In this recipe, I’m using a covered barbecue to both cook and smoke the birds. Be sure to use the indirect heat method described below in the barbecue and monitor both temperature of the barbecue and the birds with a thermometer. The objective is to cook the birds slowly enough, so that they can pick up a rich smoky flavor and you also want to be sure that they are cooked through. Enjoy a glass of Sonoma-Cutrer Pinot Noir while you are cooking.

My Grandmother’s Apple Batter Cake

This is a simple cake that my grandmother used to make often. I’ve used apples, but any fruit such as peaches, pears, berries or a combination could be incorporated. If possible, serve with Sonoma-Cutrer Late Harvest Chardonnay.

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Farm-to-Table Feast

Recipes

Go Alfresco: Farm-to-Table Entertaining

The season for dining alfresco is upon us, and farmers markets and gardens across the country are brimming with summer’s gorgeous bounty. Rather than planning yet another backyard barbecue this season, consider hosting an alfresco farm-to-table dinner party.

At Sonoma-Cutrer, every culinary event from wine and cheese pairings to our elegant four-course meals start with local ingredients. What can’t be harvested from the on-site seasonal garden is procured from local food purveyors that produce everything from mushrooms to cheese with the same care and attention to detail that goes into making fine wine.

Local ingredients aren’t just good for the environment and your local community: they simply taste better. There’s no comparison between produce that’s been harvested within the last 24 hours and fruits and vegetables that have spent the last two weeks traveling halfway around the world. Follow a few simple tips for a fun and easy foray into the popular locavore movement.

Plan the menu around what’s fresh. If you have a garden, start there – even if your “garden” consists of a lone potted herb in your kitchen windowsill. Next, head to your local farmers markets and nearby farm stands to stock up and be inspired.

Let the seasonal offerings be your guide, and get creative. The fun of hosting a farm-to-table meal is coming up with dishes that showcase the best of the season.

When it comes to preparation, keep it simple and let the ingredients speak for themselves. Use uncomplicated cooking techniques to allow the vibrant aromas, textures and flavors to shine through. The same goes for any marinades or vinaigrettes you use – simple, simple, simple.

Next, set the scene. Place a table alongside your garden where the produce was picked. Or, create a garden anywhere by dressing your table with fresh local flowers and herbs. Place foliage or candles in empty jam jars for an easy rustic charm.

Finally, uncork a bottle of Sonoma-Cutrer to toast your successful venture into farm-to-table entertaining. Try The Cutrer Chardonnay for a creamy wine to complement crisp and earthy summer vegetables, or opt for Russian River Valley Pinot Noir to enhance hearty meats with juicy, dark fruit flavors.

Most importantly, have fun! Let the season’s freshest offerings take center stage while you enjoy the company and savor the flavors found in your own backyard.

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Steak au Chard

Recipes

If you’ve never drawn a parallel between that medallion of herbed butter atop your frites-flanked rib eye steak and a buttery glass of Chardonnay, it’s time to rethink the old adage, white wine with white meats, red wines with red meats.

A full-bodied Chardonnay can stand up to the heartiest of fare thanks to the power it attains after resting in oak barrels—just like red wine! Chardonnay, in fact, pairs with a wide range of meats better than almost any other white wine because its relatively light acidity tends to complement whatever it’s paired with (rather than contrast), and its lack of bitter tannins makes it utterly versatile. Indeed, there’s a style for every meat, but which Chardonnay you choose depends more on the sauce with which you prepare and/or serve the meat. In general, it’s best to avoid highly acidic, super spicy, or super sweet sauces when pairing food with any classically dry wine. Here are our suggestions.

WHITE MEATS: CHICKEN & VEAL

White meats are both metaphorically and literally clean canvases upon which to draw flavor. Whether you sauté, grill or roast them, they remain ultimately lighter in body and flavor than, say, beef. Here’s an opportunity to pour a fruit-forward, medium-bodied Chardonnay that props up the lightness of the fare with juicy, mouthwatering flavors. Consider a wine like Sonoma-Cutrer’s Russian River Ranches. The intense fruit flavors and complexity of this Chardonnay makes this wine ideal for entertaining and versatile with food.

PINK MEATS: PORK

Unlike any other meat, pork straddles the world of light and dark protein just like Chardonnay does of white and red wines; they each possess qualities of both. While the light meat from a loin of pork looks white, it certainly more flavorful and distinctive than, say, the white meat of a chicken breast. It can handle a more full-flavored wine. The darker, richer pork from the shoulder, then, demands even more power in a wine. Among white wines there’s only one that possesses both elegance and richness to match the pork: Chardonnay. In addition to classic apple and pear fruit aromas and flavors, look for Chardonnays perfumed with toasted nuts, spice, a hint of vanilla and a touch of butter. A wine like Sonoma-Cutrer. This wine has the signature. Sonoma-Cutrer’s Sonoma Coast Chardonnay is all of that, and more.

RED MEATS: LAMB & BEEF

Pairing Chardonnay with dark meats like steak and lamb depends, moreso than in any other case, on the overall preparation, and in particular, on the accompaniments. That aforementioned steak frites served with a medallion of butter on top usually comes with a side of creamy, buttery Béarnaise sauce, too. Grilled lamb chops or butterflied leg of lamb is often served with olive oil and a squeeze of lemon. The Chardonnay to pair with any of them needs to be powerful and rich enough to stand up to the protein’s bold flavor, and complement the various sides and sauces. This is where Sonoma-Cutrer Les Pierres Chardonnay come to the table, bringing with it the prestige of a veritable California ‘Grand Cru,’ brimming with complex aromas of lime, grapefruit and lemon mixed with the flinty, mineral notes that are a defining characteristic of superior Chardonnay. Caramelized oak, vanilla and spice nuances nicely balance the citrus flavors. A perfect match.

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Mexican Style Pork Shoulder

Recipes

Slow, long cooking is the key to making this dish meltingly tender. To make it even more Mexican, shred the meat with its juices and then roll up in warm tortillas along with shredded cabbage, chopped avocados, tomatoes, sweet white onion, some cilantro leaves and lime wedges to squeeze juice over. Another option is to shred or “pull” the meat, with its juices and serve on small hamburger buns this is one of the best “sliders” you’ll ever have! Like all great braises and stews, this gets better when reheated. Also by making ahead and refrigerating you can more easily remove and discard fat that will rise to the surface. If you own a crock pot this is a great recipe for this useful appliance. All in all a great recipe to share for game day!

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Tamale Pie

Recipes

A homey, easy-to-do dish that would be perfect for game day!

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Cacio E Pepe

Recipes

Literally “cheese and pepper” this is one of the iconic recipes of Rome. It’s a stripped down macaroni and cheese that relies on good simple ingredients.

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Grilled Trout with Herbs and Pancetta

Recipes

Sustainable farm raised trout are readily available in the market. This recipe would work well with any fresh herbs you have on hand. For example, easily substitute rosemary for the sage and parsley for the mint. You could serve the trout as is or make onions agrodolce to serve with it, which are also featured in the recipe. A rich and bright Sonoma-Cutrer chardonnay, such as Les Pierres, makes the perfect pairing for this dish.

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Salsa Verde

Recipes

This is a quick little sauce of Spanish origin that is delicious on all kinds of grilled, pan seared or roasted meats, fish, and vegetables. Note that I’ve used blanched or roasted garlic rather than the fresh raw type. I think this is especially important if you are going to make the sauce ahead of time. Over time, raw garlic can become harsh and hot. Blanched or roasted garlic maintains it’s more subtle and sweet flavor and doesn’t overpower the sauce as it sits.

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Perfect Pairings for Cozy Comfort Foods

Recipes

Crisp air and crackling fireplaces turn food cravings toward warm, cozy dishes that can chase away the chill of fall’s arrival. Comfort foods like soups and stews are staples of the season, but they can be tricky to pair with wine.

Learn which wines go best with your favorite family recipes and find a few new favorites with this handy guide to warm dishes that will carry you through the cool months.

‘Tis the season for soup, and the best versions take full advantage of fresh cool-weather crops. Sonoma-Cutrer consulting chef John Ash has several soup recipes perfectly suited for the season, starting with a creamy Pumpkin Soup with Wild Mushrooms. Showcasing a pair of favorite fall flavors, this soup scores extra points when served in small, individual hollowed-out pumpkins.

Ash’s easy to prepare Winter Squash Soup is another great option if you’re short on time, and you can experiment with different types of squash. Got a fall garden bursting with radicchio? Try this simple Radicchio Soup with Smoked Goat Cheese, which tastes complex thanks to the inspired flavor contrast of smoky cheese and bitter radicchio.

All three soups are ideal pairings for a crisp glass of Russian River Ranches Chardonnay, with its elegant fruit accents and bright acidity.

If you prefer to sip red when temperatures get crisp, Sonoma-Cutrer’s Russian River Valley Pinot Noir is a fine accompaniment to many traditional fall favorites. Chili and cornbread is about as comforting as it gets, perhaps rivaled only by a warm bowl of hearty gumbo.

Both are perfect companions for the pinot, thanks to the wine’s juicy dark fruit notes and silky tannins that complement the rich, complex flavors and meatiness found in both dishes.

Finally, it’s unfathomable to talk about warming cold weather comfort foods without mentioning an all-time favorite: chicken pot pie. This savory, soul-warming dish is elevated to the next level when accompanied by a rich and creamy white like The Cutrer Chardonnay.

Whatever dishes you warm up to this season, there’s a perfect bottle of Sonoma-Cutrer wine just waiting to be uncorked.

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Ask Your Sommelier

Recipes

Most of us know the feeling of staring blankly at an extensive wine list, lost somewhere between Chardonnay and Cabernet. Paralysis by analysis – what seems to be an easy decision can quickly turn into a daunting task. Will this wine overpower the entrée? Should I have ordered red instead of white? What if I don’t like the wine I order? Enter the sommelier, master of the vine, fluent in everything wine.

If you think you know a lot about wine, sommeliers know more. The sole purpose of these dedicated professionals is to help you discover and enjoy wine as much as they do, finding the perfect complement to your meal. Yet sommeliers go largely untapped by many of us, who either forget that sommeliers are even an option or assume that our wine needs are not demanding enough or our knowledge extensive enough to justify calling in such an expert. While Master Sommelier and wine consultant, Scott Harper, concedes that sometimes people may have a level of insecurity in utilizing Sommelier services while out dining, it’s important to remember that sommeliers are there because they love helping people with wine.

Most sommeliers train for years, perfecting their craft as they explore wine culture. Master Sommeliers (there are 135 of them in North America) are even able to identify a glass of wine down to the vineyard and vintage. In a restaurant, the sommelier is in charge of wine procurement, storage, cellar rotation and, most importantly, providing expert service to wine customers.

Their main goal is to make you feel comfortable with any and all wine inquiries, not to show off their knowledge, which, rest assured, is immense. So go ahead, ask your sommelier to describe what “dry” actually means. Ask what flavors you’re tasting, which aromas you’re smelling. Ask why California Chardonnays taste different than other Chardonnays. You might just find out that the sommelier is the best-kept secret you forgot you knew.

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A Few Tips for Hosting Your Own Wine Tasting

Recipes

Having a wine tasting in your home can be fun and enjoyable way to spend the evening. Here are a few tips and thought-starters to make the night a bit easier and more entertaining.

Glassware

Except for choosing delectable wines, good wine glasses are the most important part of your tasting. It is easy to go crazy with glasses made to go with specific grapes and, granted, I have many! But, filling your cabinet with a dozen different glasses for a dozen different wines and trying to figure out which wine goes with each isn’t exactly the same as hitting the easy button. So, I suggest having one or two quality wine glasses for starters.

The size of the glass is probably the single most important factor. Glasses should hold at least 12 ounces. Personally, I prefer upwards to 20 ounces, especially for reds, which are typically served in larger glasses then whites. Pour the glasses about a fifth of the way to allow room for swirling and –to develop the aromas.

Quantity

A standard bottle of wine holds 25.4 ounces. With the intent on everyone trying each wine, one bottle of wine should serve eight guests or a 3-ounce taste. Divide the number of guests you have by eight and round up. This will tell you how many bottles you will need for the tasting. Remember to add more bottles if you are also serving a meal.

Temperature

Most Americans drink white wines too cold and red wines too warm. Overly chilled whites or too warm reds mask the aromas and flavors plus, alter the wines structure. Try serving whites around 50 degrees Fahrenheit and reds around 60 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit. This may seem too cool for red wines and not cool enough for whites but give it a go. You might be pleasantly surprised. Remember, wine is all about pleasure. So, if you end up preferring your wines cooler or warmer, enjoy them as such.

Wine Order

Normally wines are served from lightest to fullest, whites before reds and, of course, dessert wines last. Our palates usually taste better when we progress in this order. To do it inversely would be like eating a steak and then a light seafood dish.. If you are tasting Sonoma-Cutrer wines, I suggest you try this order: Chardonnay- Russian River Ranches, Sonoma Coast, Les Pierres and The Cutrer; Pinot Noir- Russian River Valley; Sweet – Late Harvest Chardonnay.

Scott Harper, MS
A Certified Wine Educator, Scott is one of 135 professionals in North America and 214 worldwide who have earned the title Master Sommelier.

 

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Malo what…?

Recipes

While tasting another delicious bottle of Chardonnay you noticed a flavor, a flavor you haven’t really picked up on before. You aren’t sure how to describe it. It is not quite popcorn, maybe it is cream…then all of a sudden someone says butter. The flavor is butter! This flavor is not present in all wines. Wines like Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling or Pinot Grigio, just wouldn’t taste right with it, but in Chardonnay it is a flavor nuance made in heaven.

So where does this flavor come from? It is a natural or induced process called malolactic fermentation or secondary fermentation. This is sometime listed on the back of wine bottle labels but, rarely explained. In reality, it is quite simple. The process changes the harder Malic acid, which is an acid found in apples, especially green apples, into the softer rounder lactic acid, which is the acid found in milk. A by-product of this process is Diacetyl. Diacetyl has an intense buttery flavor. -This helps create a wine with a creamy, softer texture.

The key to success in this process is that the buttery flavor does not dominate. Any wine that goes through malolactic fermentation will have a component of this tasty flavor, but the key is that it is in balance with the other flavors like the fruit and oak. Using malolactic fermentation is a brilliant way to enhance the complexity of balanced, flavorful Chardonnay.

The next time you taste your favorite Chardonnay see if you detect the nuance of malolactic fermentation.

About The Author

Scott Harper, MS is a Certified Wine Educator, and is one of 135 professionals in North America and 214 worldwide who have earned the title Master Sommelier

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Flavor Bridges

Recipes

The main objective of pairing -food and wine is pleasure. We should drink and eat what we like despite what any food or wine expert says is right or wrong. It is best to be open-minded enough to try different wines and foods. It is nice to try different varietals with the same foods. If you open multiple wines, open them at the same time and try each with your dish to see which you think pairs the best.

Using flavor bridges sounds complicated, but it can be as simple as using the same or similar wine in a dish that you plan to serve. For example, use a Chardonnay in your white wine butter sauce and then serve the same Chardonnay with the dish. A medium-bodied to full-bodied, dry and crisp Chardonnay like Sonoma-Cutrer’s Sonoma Coast paired with a grilled sea-bass with a Chardonnay butter sauce creates a bridge and continuity of flavors. Serving wine that has similar flavors as your food dishes will help emphasize those flavors.

Using flavor bridges is just one of the many ways to match food and wine. While there are exceptions to the above general guidelines, it will work more times than not. Remember to pair wine and foods of similar weight for best effect. By implementing a few, simple techniques, you will definitely enjoy a more exceptional experience than the boring red wine with red meat and white wine with white meat. Give it a try and see where it take you!

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Pan Seared Duck Breast With Blackberry Sage Sauce

Recipes

This is a delicious dish and I think a perfect match with Sonoma-Cutrer Pinot Noir. The sauce can be made ahead and reheated. Serve with an earthy combination of pan roasted mushrooms and sautéed kale.

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Pimento Cheeseburger

Recipes

A classic comfort food with a delightful twist. Perfect for sharing with your beloved on date night, or serving the entire family. Pair with Sonoma-Cutrer Russian River Valley Pinot Noir.

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Red Snapper Veracruz Style

Recipes

This is one of the classic and simple dishes of Mexico from the important seacoast town of Vera Cruz. You can make it with any firm-fleshed white fish such as grouper, halibut, sea bass, tilapia, etc. This is fantastic paired with The Cutrer Chardonnay.

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Pasta with Roasted Tomatoes, Capers and Olives

Recipes

Everyone needs a simple go-to pasta recipe and this is a favorite. Other seasonal vegetables could be added to this including sautéed diced zucchini, eggplant, or mushrooms. Use San Marzano canned tomatoes if you can find them. Russian River Valley Pinot Noir will make this a special meal!

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Braised Short Ribs with Soft Polenta

Recipes

For this dish, just about anything can be added to flavor the rich braising liquid. Some ideas are dried porcini mushrooms (rehydrated and sautéed along with the onions), or even a little ancho or chipotle chile. The dish freezes beautifully and is even better when made ahead of time. A Vine Hill Pinot Noir would be a terrific pair for this meal.

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Asparagus Ravioli in Brown Butter Sauce

Recipes

For this classic dish, you could also use fresh pasta for this in place of the wontons. It will take a little longer to cook, of course, but will be just as delicious. Serve with a Sonoma-Cutrer Sonoma Coast Chardonnay.

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Duck Braised With Prunes

Recipes

This simple French inspired rustic braise is served with sautéed apples. Pick an apple that doesn’t turn mushy, but holds its shape when cooked; Cortland, Jonagold, Northern Spy, Winesap, and Golden Delicious all fit the bill nicely.

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Sea Scallop Carpaccio

Recipes

This is an easy first course and depends on getting the best, freshest and largest scallops possible. Specify to your fishmonger that you want dry pack or diver scallops. Dry-packed scallops are scallops that are shucked, packed and shipped on ice.

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Duck Breast Salad with Oranges

Recipes

Duck breast is a delicacy, and one breast can easily serve two people separated into supremes. An elegant portion is a perfect complement to this rich, delicious salad served with a glass of Founders Reserve Pinot Noir.

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Pork Stew with White Beans and Butternut Squash

Recipes

This is a simple and rustic stew that could also be prepared in the slow cooker. It’s perfect for the fall season. The rich Owsley Pinot Noir is a treat when paired with this stew.

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Sablefish With Chanterelles and Parsley

Recipes

The parsley sauce can be made a day ahead of time, refrigerated, and reheated. The mushrooms can be cooked an hour or two ahead, making this a pretty simple recipe. Any wild mushroom that you like can be substituted for the chanterelles. Likewise, any firm white fish can be substituted for the sablefish.

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Risotto With Asparagus, Roasted Garlic, and Lemon

Recipes

Risottos are wonderful “comfort foods”. The key is to make sure that when the risotto gets to that magic place where each grain of rice is soft and creamy, but still with a little texture in the very center. Serve it up immediately! If you wait more than a few minutes it gets too soft and gummy. This recipe is best when paired with our Russian River Ranches Chardonnay.

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Grilled Spiced Spring Lamb Chops With Butter Braised Spinach

Recipes

In America, we are finally beginning to use and appreciate the world of spices. This simple recipe puts together both savory and sweet spices to flavor the lamb. Pair with Russian River Valley Pinot Noir.

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Couscous Risotto

Recipes

This recipe uses a kind of Couscous​ known as Israeli couscous. The great thing about Israeli couscous​ is that you can make a risotto in half the time of a rice-based version. This vegetarian dish goes well with the Russian River Valley Pinot Noir.

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Bucatini with Pancetta and Pecorino

Recipes

This dish exemplifies just how a few good ingredients can make a superb dish. All kinds of variations are possible with this recipe, including the addition of finely chopped ripe tomatoes, thinly sliced and sautéed onions, or tender spinach leaves. Enjoy with a glass of Russian River Valley Pinot Noir.

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Miso Marinated Black Cod

Recipes

Miso is best known in America as the base for Miso soup, but it also makes a delicious marinade. The following recipe can be used with fish, chicken or pork. Crisp Founders Reserve  Chardonnay is a great counterpoint to this flavorful dish.

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Pan Roasted Salmon With Green Goddess Dressing

Recipes

Green Goddess dressing was created in San Francisco in 1920 at the Palace Hotel to honor the British actor, George Arliss, who was starring in a play there called The Green Goddess. This rich dish is wonderful when paired with the equally rich Founder’s Reserve Chardonnay. With this recipe, you’ll have enough vinaigrette and Green Goddess dressing left over to use for other salads.

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Spaghetti Marco Polo

Recipes

Create a night to remember and create this no-fuss pasta dish that they’ll love. This meal is best when served with a glass of bright Les Pierres Chardonnay.

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Five Spice Pork Chops With Apples

Recipes

Five-spice powder is a Chinese spice mix and typically contains star anise, cloves, cinnamon, Szechuan pepper and fennel seeds which are ground together to make an aromatic seasoning. Best used on fatty meats such as duck or pork five-spice powder is available in most markets, but it’s also easy to make and better when freshly ground. The roasted apples can be left chunky or mashed into a sauce. Pair this dish with the fragrant and spicy Russian River Pinot Noir.

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Pineapple and Cola Glazed Ham

Recipes

This is a variation on a recipe from John Ash’s Grandmother, who always made the Easter ham. This simple, but delicious recipe is best complemented by Les Pierres Chardonnay.

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Grilled Ratatouille

Recipes

Visit your farmer’s market and select your favorite vegetables to feature in this colorful dish.

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Grilled Lobster

Recipes

One of my favorite ways – especially during the spring and summer months – to cook lobster is to do so on the grill. The shells char as the meat cooks, giving the lobster a delicious flavor. This dish is lovely paired with Rosé of Pinot Noir and Sauvignon Blanc.

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Brined Pan Roasted Chicken

Recipes

A new, delicate flavor profile is added to a family favorite recipe by adding feta cheese to the brine. Pair this dish with The Cutrer chardonnay.

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Acqua Pazza

Recipes

The name of this dish literally translates to “fish in crazy water” and, like most Italian recipes, there are as many variations on this dish as there are cooks who make it. It reportedly originates with the fishermen of Naples and is a bright, clean, delicious dish. This is a simple dish to prepare and is well complemented by the Les Pierres Chardonnay, with its crisp and elegant acidity.

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Hanger Steak With Bagna Cauda Sauce

Recipes

Bagna Cauda is traditionally a vegetable dipping sauce from northern Italy, but it doubles as a perfect steak sauce. The anchovies are key to this dish, adding a mouth-watering umami. Complete this dish with a glass of Vine Hill Pinot Noir.

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Mushrooms Bourguignon

Recipes

A perfectly rich date-night recipe that can be made ahead of time. Have a glass of Owsley Pinot Noir ready for your sweetheart to sip during this romantic meal.

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Slow Roasted Duck

Recipes

This simple recipe takes the mystery out of cooking a delicious duck. Order yours from the market with a couple days notice. Pair this dish with the complex flavors of our Owsley Pinot Noir.

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Mushrooms Baked in Beggars Purses

Recipes

This is a quick and simple preparation that can be done in the oven using parchment, on a grill, or in coals using foil. Any combination of mushrooms that you like is fodder for this dish. Just remember, the herb bundles are for flavor and aroma, but not to be eaten. Other ingredients can be added, for instance, a few slices of meaty black olives or a few capers. This dish is delicious with Russian River Valley Pinot Noir.

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Sonoma-Cutrer’s top priority is always to protect the health and wellness of our guests and employees. Our team has been actively monitoring the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation, especially as it relates to Sonoma County, CA. We have decided to suspend all tours and tastings at Sonoma-Cutrer beginning March 14, 2020.

As we all navigate through this dynamic situation, our goal is to further minimize risk to our valued guests, employees and the potential spread of the virus to their families and communities. While we expect this disruption to our tours and tastings to be temporary, our closure will remain in place until this health emergency subsides and officials declare it safe to resume normal activity. 

In the meantime, if you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact us directly. You may contact our tasting room at (707) 237-3489 or [email protected]. For wine club questions, please call (707) 237-3498 or email [email protected]. We will be checking our phone messages and emails daily.

Additionally, you may find information as it pertains specifically to Sonoma County, CA at sonomacounty.com/coronavirus.

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